SAM Updates Its Registration Process

Last week, the System for Award Management (SAM) updated its registration process, which is required before an organization can receive a federal grant. Now, when you register a new entity in SAM to do business with the U.S. government, SAM requires you to send an original, signed notarized letter stating you are the authorized entity administrator before SAM will activate your SAM.gov registration.

System for Award Management logo

Wondering to yourself, “How do I complete my entity administrator notarized letter?” Read this FAQ from the Federal Service Desk (FSD) for more information.

Looking for more detailed information about this change, who is impacted, or wondering why it was made? Read this SAM Update from the General Services Administration (GSA).

The Future of SAM.gov

There’s a lot going on under the star-spangled top hat of SAM.gov.

Grants.gov users know SAM.gov as the website on which they need to register in order to do business with the U.S. government. On SAM.gov, users can create an entity registration, update or renew an entity registration, check status of an entity registration, and search for entity registration and exclusion records.

But a new, beta version of the website still in development promises to make the site’s feature set far more expansive.

Plans are in place to consolidate under SAM.gov 10 existing federal award systems that are managed by the General Services Administration’s (GSA) Integrated Award Environment. These systems handle assistance listings, contract opportunities, wage determinations, and sub-award data, among other things.

SAM.gov

Image credit: GSA.gov

Continue reading The Future of SAM.gov

Share Your Feedback on the General Services Administration’s RFI for ‘Government-Wide Entity Identification and Validation Services’

A critical part of registering as an applicant organization with Grants.gov involves entering a DUNS number – or obtaining one before proceeding.

A DUNS number is a unique nine-character number that Grants.gov and other programs use to identify your organization. For example, the federal government uses the DUNS number to track how federal money is allocated. Applicants doing business with the federal government can get one for free through Dun and Bradstreet (D&B).

General Services Administration RFI

In 2018, the D&B contract with the federal government’s General Services Administration (GSA) expires, and the GSA has released a Request for Information (RFI) for government-wide entity identification and validation services.

Continue reading Share Your Feedback on the General Services Administration’s RFI for ‘Government-Wide Entity Identification and Validation Services’